Community-Led Business Models (that might just work…)

IN AI Bot Chat
  • Updated:11 months ago
  • Reading Time:63Minutes
  • Post Words:15945Words
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Brainstorming community-driven business models (inspired by “OneSmallTown”) where members collectively establish businesses and contribute 3 hours of their time, skills, or $40 worth of produce per week. Participants who donate their time share equally in the profits with the goal of overcoming financial hardship, hopelessness, oppression, and providing solutions to the impending financial crash.

OneSmallTown-canchangetheworld

This PowerPoint will teach you more about this model. A third of the business is owned by an investor, while the community holds the majority ownership with two-thirds and the community has the ultimate decision on accepting investors so that the evil-types can’t come in and take advantage. The investor may become manager of the business or just remain an investor.

Find information about OneSmallTown including videos (which I can’t watch right now due to internet issues, so my post will be inaccurate until I do), and other detailed information at:

I recently rediscovered this, after previously misunderstanding it (I initially believed it required relocating to a remote area and starting there, but it works within existing towns and cities: you go about your normal life, but you volunteer 3 hours of your time to a community-run “FOR-PROFIT” business in the community that shares the dividends, products, and profits with the volunteers.

It explains how communities in every town and city can work and profit together with just 3 hours of their time per week, without having to move to rural areas. All you need is a group of 24 or more people who understand the concept.

I won’t pretend that I fully-understand it at this point, but I’m inspired to brainstorm ideas whilst we have free limited-time access to the artificial intelligence at https://chat.openai.com/.

By working a maximum of 6 hours a week, you will receive a coupon for every 3 hours you put in. The system will allow you to list your skills and output, and the business will assign tasks to participants based on the required skills, availability, and other factors. The coupon you receive grants you access to the benefits of all products, services, or inventions produced, and you will receive an equal share of the profits from the business, which will be distributed monthly.

This idea might help us regain control of our local communities from big corporations. It focuses on towns with 5,000 to 50,000 residents and involves working with local leaders and schools. A community council will be formed to benefit the community instead of serving corporate interests like current politicians do.

I believe, especially after the past three years, that we have reached a rather obvious and critical point in time where action must be taken by the people to prevent the devastating consequences of the coming financial crash and a digital enslavement system.

This might be a way to turn corrupt and toxic industries into community-led co-ops that transform various aspects of life such as Agriculture, Health, Care-giving, Education, Automotive, Fuel, Energy, Rent/Housing, Media and Film, Legal, and the Community in general.

The people must understand that WE are the ones running the countries and corporations, that WE are the labour and skills, and that WE are the growers and servers. WE are the ones we’ve been waiting for.

Brainstorming ideas….

Random Keywords to Brainstorm

These are just my random thoughts to get me thinking of different industries…

  • Sporting Events, Conferences, Festivals, Markets
  • Education, home-based education, children-adults, Skill-sharing Courses, Critical thinking, community-led schools
  • Care-Giving, Healthcare, Aged care, disability care, nursing, retirement homes
  • Manufacturing,
  • Agriculture, food co-ops, farming, food-swapping, seed-growing, mRNA-free organic food, food forests, seeding abandoned land
  • Hospitality, restaurants, cafes, food trucks
  • Health, healing foods, alternative-medicine, Integrative functional medicine, etc.
  • Pharma-replacement (Nutraceuticals; food-derived products that contain functional and fortified foods to enhance health and prevent disease)
  • Media, community-press, community-newspapers, community-internet,
  • Film, community-film
  • Music, community-music, dance
  • Art, Creative Expression
  • Exercise, Active-Activities
  • Make legal services accessible by partnering with human rights firms, educating communities on their rights and solutions, building a database of common solutions, and promoting bartering for legal advice. Bring honesty back to the flawed legal system and support those who prioritize humanity over exploiting it
  • Councils, community-led town decisions
  • Sustainability: (not-politicized), free energy, land-care, wildlife-care
  • Housing, van-dwelling, caravan parks, motels, land-sharing, working with local landlords to create community-friendly solutions
  • Internet – community-led internet company
  • Tech – community-led Tech alternatives
  • Re-use: (not-politicized), Op-shops, Book-swaps, Clothes, Tools, and Appliance sharing, Up-cycle workshops and markets, sewing, tool-repair
  • Automotive – Invention, Repair, Free-Fuel,
  • Alternative Travel Transport: Private Helicopters, Planes, Ships, Boats, Bikes, Car-sharing
  • Storage – self-storage warehouses and self-storage land, trailer sharing, storage-sharing
  • EMF-Protection companies – Shielding, community-led policies (not industry-led), testing, clothes, paint, emf-shielding products for phones, routers, towers
  • Lighting and lamps – replace the dangerous LED lighting with those safe for human health
  • Balcony Grow boxes, Ready-to-Go Herb Gardens, Ready-to-Go Seed collections with instructions
  • Greenhouse companies, Seedlings, Plants, Food Boxes
  • Science – ethical and honest scientists and researchers rather than industry-sponsored science-fiction
  • Financial System – educating people on what has happened, and what we can do to circumvent it
  • Websites or Online Communities – our own online communities that are not sponsored by industry and bigtech, where we can actually help each other, re: meetups, events, education, swapping ideas, bartering, schedules, community-inventions & products, and education. Alternative to Facebook Marketplace, Gumtree, etc.
  • Funeral Industry – community-led instead of industry-led
  • Construction – community-led instead of corruption-led
  • Transport, Trucking, Package deliveries, Product distribution
  • Worm & Compost Farming – collect food scraps from residential areas and restaurants, collect non-toxic cardboard, place branch/wood trailers in town, work with trailer-rentals
  • Timber Industry – re-use, re-cycle, convert existing timber into re-usable timber, work with landscapers and gardeners
  • Appliances – repair & renew, teaching opportunity, skill-sharing, second-life to broken appliances, work with op shops, garage sales, create a “spot on side of the road” notification service
  • Mental Health & Support for people who are “awake”
  • Microloan Financial Support for community, that feeds into the bartering system (i.e. stop making the poor poorer if they can’t afford to pay back the loans… need an honest and fair way to provide support that doesn’t put people in further debt-cycles)
  • Caravan-Hire, Van-Share, Truck-Share, Bus-Share, Trailer-Share, etc.
  • Removals Industry
  • Accounting and Bookkeeping services – for all the community-led businesses
  • House-share, House-sitting, Pet-Sitting,
  • Home-Repairs, Maintenance, Handy-man services
  • Meal-share services, bulk-meals for families, communities, homeless
  • Rent-to-own services

20 Businesses that are run by the community in Australia

  1. The Community Food Co-op
  2. The South Melbourne Market
  3. The Finders Keepers Market
  4. The New Farm Deli
  5. The Community Refillery
  6. The Eco-Larder
  7. The Collingwood General Store
  8. The Common Ground Cafe
  9. The Community Garden Market
  10. The Urban Harvest Farmers Market
  11. The Bondi Open Air Cinema
  12. The Beyond The Bin
  13. The Community Solar Bulk Buy
  14. The Good For Food Co-op
  15. The Bendigo Community Farmers Market
  16. The East Fremantle Community Garden
  17. The ReUse Hub
  18. The Community Garden Store
  19. The Zero Waste Hub
  20. The Brunswick Food Co-op.

20 Businesses that have closed down due to technological changes

It’s difficult to provide a comprehensive list of 20 businesses that have closed down due to technological changes, as this can vary greatly depending on the industry and region. However, here are a few examples:

  1. Kodak – disrupted by digital photography
  2. Blockbuster – disrupted by online streaming
  3. Borders – disrupted by online book retail
  4. Polaroid – disrupted by digital cameras
  5. Tower Records – disrupted by online music retail
  6. Sears – disrupted by online retail
  7. RadioShack – disrupted by online retail and changes in consumer electronics
  8. Circuit City – disrupted by online retail and changes in consumer electronics
  9. Kodak Ektachrome film – disrupted by digital photography
  10. New York Times Company’s Regional Newspapers – disrupted by online news
  11. Kodak’s Instant Camera System – disrupted by digital photography
  12. BlackBerry – disrupted by smartphones
  13. Nokia – disrupted by smartphones
  14. Xerox – disrupted by digital document management
  15. Blockbuster Video – disrupted by online streaming
  16. Kodak’s Film and One-Time-Use Cameras – disrupted by digital photography
  17. Kodak’s Flexographic Packaging Division – disrupted by digital printing
  18. Kodak’s OLED Display Business – disrupted by advancements in display technology
  19. Kodak’s Printer Ink Business – disrupted by changes in consumer printing
  20. Kodak’s Photo Kiosk Business – disrupted by online photo sharing and printing.

Which industries are most frequently plagued by corruption driven by greed?

Corruption driven by greed affects various industries, but some of the most commonly affected include politics, finance, construction, and resources such as oil, gas, and minerals. Other industries, such as healthcare and pharmaceuticals, may also be impacted.

Design a business model in agriculture for community volunteers

Design a business model in agriculture where the community can volunteer 3 hours of their time per week and all community members profit from both the produce and the business earnings.

Here’s a business model for an agriculture project that utilizes community involvement and offers benefits for everyone involved:

  1. Community-Owned Agricultural Cooperative: A group of local residents form a cooperative that owns and operates the agricultural business. Members contribute labor and resources to the business and share in the profits.
  2. Volunteer Program: Each member commits to volunteering three hours of their time per week to work on the farm.
  3. Crop Production: The cooperative grows a variety of crops using sustainable and eco-friendly methods.
  4. Community Supported Agriculture (CSA): Members can subscribe to receive a weekly share of the fresh produce grown on the farm.
  5. Farmers Market: The cooperative sells excess produce at a local farmers market, generating additional income for the business and its members.
  6. On-Site Sales: The cooperative also operates a farm stand where members and the community can purchase fresh produce and other products.
  7. Education and Outreach: The cooperative offers workshops and events to educate the community on sustainable agriculture practices.

By working together and sharing the rewards, this business model empowers the community to support local agriculture, improve their health and well-being, and create a more sustainable future.

Design a business model in a Healthy Food Truck for Weekend Markets

Design a business model in a Healthy Food Truck for Weekend Markets where the community can volunteer 3 hours of their time per week and all community members profit from both the produce and the business earnings.

A healthy food truck business model could involve a community-owned food truck that operates at weekend markets. The business would source ingredients from local farmers and focus on offering healthy, sustainable and locally sourced food options. Community members can volunteer 3 hours of their time per week to help with tasks such as food preparation, serving customers, and cleaning up.

All community members would be eligible to share in the profits of the business, including earnings from food sales and other revenue streams such as catering events and private parties. This business model would encourage community involvement and support local agriculture while promoting healthy eating and a sustainable lifestyle. Additionally, the profits from the business can be used to support other community initiatives or projects.

What skills and knowledge are required to establish and operate a food truck business?

To establish and operate a food truck business, the following skills and knowledge are required:

  1. Business and Entrepreneurial Skills
  2. Financial Management and Budgeting
  3. Marketing and Branding
  4. Menu Planning and Recipe Development
  5. Food Safety and Sanitation
  6. Cooking and Kitchen Management
  7. Customer Service and Sales
  8. Vehicle Maintenance and Upkeep
  9. Event Planning and Coordination
  10. Regulatory Compliance and Licensing.

Design a business model in Free-Press for community volunteers

Design a business model in a Free Press newsletter where the community can volunteer 3 hours of their time per week and all community members benefit from shared-education, services, and business earnings.

A Free Press newsletter business model can be designed as a community-driven and cooperative endeavor, where members volunteer 3 hours of their time per week to contribute to the newsletter’s content, distribution, and administration. In return, all members can benefit from shared-education, access to information and services, and a portion of the business earnings. This model can emphasize transparency, accountability, and shared ownership, promoting the values of a free and independent press while supporting the community’s interests and goals.

What are some ideas on regular topics to include in a community newsletter that will benefit the community with education, tips, and truth?

  1. Local events and community news
  2. Health and wellness tips
  3. Financial literacy and budgeting advice
  4. Environmental sustainability and green initiatives
  5. Education and learning opportunities
  6. Updates on local government and politics
  7. Safety and emergency preparedness information
  8. Job and career development resources
  9. Food and cooking recipes and tips
  10. Volunteer opportunities and local charity initiatives
  11. Interviews with local leaders and community members
  12. Product and service reviews for local businesses
  13. Fun and engaging activities for families
  14. Stories of local success and inspiration
  15. Real estate and housing market updates
  16. Access to local resources and support services
  17. Creative and cultural events and activities
  18. Sport and recreation updates
  19. Tips for staying active and healthy
  20. Updates on emerging technologies and innovations.

20 community-led initiatives that will benefit the entire community

What are some community-led initiatives that will benefit the entire community?

  1. Community gardening or agriculture projects
  2. Neighborhood watch programs
  3. Local recycling initiatives
  4. Clean-up campaigns
  5. Community-led skill-sharing programs
  6. Neighborhood-based safety programs
  7. Affordable housing initiatives
  8. Food banks and pantries
  9. Youth mentorship programs
  10. Community-led health and wellness initiatives
  11. Volunteer-run libraries
  12. Community-led art and cultural programs
  13. Energy-saving initiatives
  14. Neighborhood-based transportation solutions
  15. Support groups for marginalized communities
  16. Emergency response networks
  17. Job training and placement programs
  18. Environmental conservation efforts
  19. Free or low-cost legal services for those in need
  20. Community-led fundraising initiatives.

Business Model for Temporary Housing

Design a business model for a Community to use (like a Retirement Village), where the community can volunteer 3 hours of their time per week, and all community members benefit from low-cost temporary housing, shared-resources, and business earnings.

Here is a possible business model for a community-led housing initiative:

  1. Community Co-Ownership: The community forms a co-operative where all members collectively own and operate the housing initiative.
  2. Volunteer Hours: Each member is expected to contribute 3 hours of their time per week to help maintain and improve the housing initiative. This helps keep costs low and fosters a sense of community.
  3. Low-Cost Temporary Housing: The initiative provides affordable, temporary housing options for members in need. This could include tiny homes, RV spaces, or shared living arrangements.
  4. Shared Resources: The initiative provides shared resources such as common areas, kitchens, and laundry facilities, reducing the cost of living for individual members.
  5. Business Earnings: The initiative generates revenue through rental fees, community events, and other business activities. All profits are distributed among members, providing an additional source of income.
  6. Community Decision Making: All major decisions regarding the initiative are made through a democratic process, ensuring that the community’s needs and interests are prioritized.
  7. Collaboration with Local Partners: The initiative partners with local businesses, government agencies, and non-profits to increase resources and support for the community.

Business Model for Self-Storage Business

Design a business model for a Self-Storage business, where the community can volunteer 3 hours of their time per week, and all community members benefit from access to the storage, and business earnings.

A self-storage business model could be established as a community-run initiative, where members volunteer 3 hours of their time per week in exchange for access to the storage and shared profits from the business earnings.

The business could function as follows:

  1. Members pay a monthly fee to rent a self-storage unit and become co-owners of the business.
  2. Volunteer hours can be used for tasks such as customer service, maintenance, and management of the facilities.
  3. The business can generate additional revenue by offering value-added services such as packing and moving supplies, insurance, and online rental and payment options.
  4. Profits from the business are distributed among the members based on their participation and investment.
  5. Members also have access to shared resources such as a community space, a workshop, and shared equipment.

This business model creates a sustainable, community-led solution for self-storage, while providing members with access to storage and shared profits.

Business model for a Vehicle Rental and Sharing enterprise

Design a business model for a Vehicle Rental and Sharing enterprise, where community members can volunteer 3 hours per week and enjoy access to vehicles including campervans, removalist trucks, trailers, cars, buses, transport trucks, and motorcycles, as well as share in the business earnings.

The proposed business model for a Vehicle Rental and Sharing enterprise would involve the community volunteering 3 hours per week in order to benefit from access to the enterprise’s fleet of vehicles, including campervans, removalist trucks, trailers, cars, buses, transport trucks, and motorcycles. The community would also share in the profits generated by the enterprise. The volunteer hours could be used for tasks such as maintaining and cleaning the vehicles, managing bookings and reservations, and marketing the business to attract new customers. This would help to create a sustainable and cooperative business model, where the community benefits from low-cost access to vehicles, as well as from the financial success of the enterprise.

Business model for a Skill-Sharing enterprise

Design a business model for a Skill-Sharing enterprise, where community members can volunteer 3 hours per week and enjoy access to new skills and education including real history, appliance and clothing repair, legal information, permaculture, handy-man skills, automobile-repair, construction, art, film, music, internet technologies, critical thinking, as well as share in the business earnings.

The Skill-Sharing enterprise business model would involve the following steps:

  1. Community members would be encouraged to volunteer 3 hours of their time per week to the enterprise.
  2. The enterprise would offer a wide range of skill and education workshops in areas such as real history, appliance and clothing repair, legal information, permaculture, handy-man skills, automobile-repair, construction, art, film, music, internet technologies, and critical thinking.
  3. These workshops would be taught by community members with expertise in the respective fields.
  4. The enterprise would generate revenue through workshop fees and could also potentially earn revenue through partnerships with companies or organizations in related industries.
  5. All community members would share in the business earnings, creating a sense of ownership and investment in the success of the enterprise.
  6. The enterprise would provide a platform for community members to learn new skills and share their own knowledge, fostering a sense of community and collaboration.

Business model for a Tool & Appliance sharing enterprise

Design a business model for a Tool and Appliance Sharing business where community members can volunteer 3 hours per week and have access to tools and appliances including lawnmowers, catering equipment, washing machines, carpet cleaners, garden tools, handy-man tools, laptops, video cameras, microphones, event equipment, EMF-testing equipment, camping equipment, portable fridges and freezers, in addition to workshops for teaching the proper usage and repair of the tools. Community members also benefit from sharing in the business earnings.

This business model can be run as a community-based cooperative where members contribute their time and resources to the pool of available tools and appliances. Members can volunteer 3 hours per week to help maintain the equipment and keep the workshop running. In exchange, they can access and use any of the tools and appliances they need, as well as attend workshops to learn how to use and repair them. Additionally, all community members will share in the business earnings generated by the cooperative. The cooperative could generate income through renting out equipment to non-members or through offering repair services.

Design a business model for a Tool and Appliance Repair service where community members can volunteer 3 hours per week to learn and teach others how to repair, recycle, and upcycle tools and appliances via workshops, and the workshops will involve actual repair and recycling processes which will create products to be sold and members will share in the profits.

The business model for the Tool and Appliance Repair service would involve the community members volunteering 3 hours of their time per week to attend workshops and learn how to repair, recycle, and upcycle tools and appliances. The workshops would involve hands-on repair and recycling processes, leading to the creation of refurbished products that can be sold. All community members would share in the profits generated by the business.

What tools and appliances have the most profitable repair opportunities?

The tools and appliances with the most profitable repair opportunities are subject to change and may vary depending on demand, availability of replacement parts, repair difficulty, and the cost of the tool or appliance. Some examples of potentially profitable items for repair include high-end electronics, power tools, kitchen appliances, and outdoor power equipment.

  • high-end electronics (smartphones, laptops, tablets, gaming systems, home theater systems, cameras)
  • power tools (cordless drill, circular saw, impact driver, jigsaw, router, reciprocating saw, planer, palm sander, power drill, air compressor, nail gun, staple gun)
  • kitchen appliances (blenders, dishwashers, ovens, microwaves, toasters, slow cooker, coffee makers, refrigerators, rice cookers, pressure cookers)
  • household appliances (vacuum cleaner, air conditioner, dehumidifier, heater, fan, iron, hair dryer, electric shaver, steam cleaner, washer and dryer, water dispenser, sewing machine, bread machine, electric mixer, humidifier, air purifier, lamp, clock, radio, television, dvd player, game console, stereos, projectors)

Sample Workshop: Repair Mobile Phone

Create a sample Workshop on the repair of a mobile phone

Here’s a sample workshop on mobile phone repair:

  1. Introduction (30 minutes)
  • Welcome participants and introduce the workshop instructor.
  • Explain the purpose of the workshop and the skills that will be covered.
  • Overview of basic repair tools, equipment, and materials.
  1. Basic Mobile Phone Repair Techniques (60 minutes)
  • Introduction to different types of mobile phones and their basic components.
  • Discuss common mobile phone issues, such as battery replacement, screen replacement, and speaker repair.
  • Demonstrate basic repair techniques, such as opening the phone, removing the battery, and replacing the screen.
  1. Advanced Mobile Phone Repair Techniques (60 minutes)
  • Discussion of advanced repair techniques, such as circuit board repair, component replacement, and firmware updates.
  • Demonstrate advanced repair techniques, such as soldering and desoldering, component replacement, and firmware updates.
  • Discuss the importance of safety and caution when performing advanced repairs.
  1. Practice Session (60 minutes)
  • Participants will be given the opportunity to practice what they have learned on a provided phone.
  • Participants can ask questions and receive feedback from the instructor.
  1. Q&A and Conclusion (30 minutes)
  • Participants can ask questions and receive answers from the instructor.
  • Discuss best practices for repairing mobile phones, such as buying quality tools, reading repair guides, and practicing.
  • Conclude the workshop with a summary of the skills learned and a demonstration of the repaired mobile phone.

Note: This is a sample workshop and may vary depending on the experience level of the participants and the scope of the workshop. The instructor may add or remove topics based on the needs of the participants.

Sample Workshop: Repair Washing Machine

Create a sample Workshop on the repair of a Washing Machine

Here is a sample outline for a 3-hour workshop on washing machine repair:

  1. Introduction (15 minutes):
    • Welcome the participants and introduce the workshop.
    • Briefly cover the importance of learning to repair household appliances.
    • Provide a brief overview of the agenda for the workshop.
  2. Types of washing machines and their components (30 minutes):
    • Explain the different types of washing machines available in the market and how they differ.
    • Highlight the common components found in a washing machine and their functions.
    • Show visual aids to help participants understand the different parts.
  3. Common washing machine issues and troubleshooting (45 minutes):
    • Discuss some of the most common issues faced by washing machine owners and how to troubleshoot them.
    • Topics could include problems with draining, spinning, and filling.
    • Explain how to diagnose the root cause of the problem and what steps can be taken to resolve it.
  4. Practical demonstration (1 hour 30 minutes):
    • Demonstrate how to disassemble a washing machine and access the different parts.
    • Demonstrate how to diagnose and repair common issues with a washing machine.
    • Encourage participants to ask questions and get hands-on experience with repairing a washing machine.
  5. Q&A and wrap-up (30 minutes):
    • Allow participants to ask any questions they may have about washing machine repair.
    • Provide a brief summary of what was covered in the workshop.
    • Distribute any reference materials or additional resources for future use.
    • Conclude the workshop and thank participants for their time.

Create a community-led Clothing, Costume, Tool, and Book Library

Create a community-led Clothing, Costume, Tool, and Book Library where the community volunteers 3 hours of their time a week and profits from the business. How would the library make profit?

A community-led Clothing, Costume, Tool, and Book Library could generate profit through the following methods:

  1. Rentals: Members could rent out items such as costumes, tools, and books for a fee.
  2. Sales: The library could sell items that are no longer needed or in demand to generate revenue.
  3. Donations: The library could accept donations from members and community organizations, which could then be used to purchase new items for the library.
  4. Memberships: Members could be required to pay a membership fee to access the library’s resources and receive discounts on rentals and sales.
  5. Workshops: The library could host workshops on how to repair and upcycle clothing, costumes, and tools, as well as how to use certain tools and appliances. These workshops could be charged for, generating additional income for the library.

By incorporating these methods, the community-led Clothing, Costume, Tool, and Book Library could become self-sustaining and generate enough income to cover its operating costs, while also providing valuable resources and opportunities for its members.

Create a community-led business portal where 15 businesses could run out of the same building

Design a scheduling plan for a community-led business portal where 15 businesses share one building, each operating on different days, with volunteers committing to work 3 hours per week.

To schedule which days each of the 15 businesses will operate in the shared building, the following steps can be followed:

  1. Assign a designated coordinator to oversee the scheduling process.
  2. Gather information on the business hours of operation and the desired days of operation for each business.
  3. Create a spreadsheet or table that lists the 15 businesses and their preferred days of operation.
  4. Analyze the available days and timeslots and make adjustments as necessary to ensure that no two businesses are operating on the same day at the same time.
  5. Allocate a specific day for each business, taking into account the volunteers’ availability and the desired business hours.
  6. Communicate the schedule to all volunteers, businesses and stakeholders to ensure that everyone is aware of their designated day and time.
  7. Review and update the schedule on a regular basis to ensure that it remains effective and meets the needs of all parties involved.

How would you divide 5 rooms among 15 businesses, allowing each to use one room for operation one day a week, while allowing other businesses to use the same room on other days?

One solution to allocate the 5 rooms among 15 businesses would be to use a rotating schedule that allows each business to use one room for operation one day per week, and then another business would use the same room on the following day. This schedule could be organized in a spreadsheet or online calendar, with clear guidelines for room usage, cleaning, and availability. Additionally, an open communication system between businesses could help ensure a smooth operation and efficient usage of the shared space.

Create a schedule for 15 businesses to share a building with 5 rooms on a rotating basis, so that each business uses a specific room for operation on the same day of the week (e.g. Business 1 uses Room 1 every Monday, Business 2 uses Room 2 every Monday, Business 3 uses Room 3 every Monday – 5 businesses per day) and the remaining 10 businesses use the same room on different days always keeping the same day of the week.

Here is a sample schedule for 15 businesses to share a building with 5 rooms, with each business using the same room every week on the same day:

Day 1 (Monday)

  • Business 1: Room 1
  • Business 2: Room 2
  • Business 3: Room 3
  • Business 4: Room 4
  • Business 5: Room 5

Day 2 (Tuesday)

  • Business 6: Room 1
  • Business 7: Room 2
  • Business 8: Room 3
  • Business 9: Room 4
  • Business 10: Room 5

Day 3 (Wednesday)

  • Business 11: Room 1
  • Business 12: Room 2
  • Business 13: Room 3
  • Business 14: Room 4
  • Business 15: Room 5

And the cycle repeats every week. This schedule ensures that each business has a dedicated room for operation one day a week, while still allowing the other businesses to share the same room on different days.

Business model for a Community-led Manufacturing enterprise

Business model for a Community-led Manufacturing enterprise where the community volunteers 3 hours of their time a week and profits from the business.

Business model for a Community-led Restaurant

Create a Business model for a Community-led Restaurant which favours locally-grown organic foods and community-focused events and evening-seminars, movie nights, fun activities & workshops where the community volunteers 3 hours of their time a week and profits from the business.

The community-led restaurant business model would involve the following steps:

  1. Establish a community-driven organization with a focus on locally-grown organic foods, events, and activities.
  2. Collaborate with local farmers to source fresh, organic ingredients for the restaurant menu.
  3. Involve the community by offering volunteer opportunities, where members can contribute 3 hours of their time each week in exchange for a share in the restaurant’s profits.
  4. Create a menu that showcases the locally-sourced ingredients, highlighting their freshness and quality. Offer a variety of dishes to cater to different tastes and dietary requirements.
  5. Host community-focused events and evening seminars, movie nights, and fun activities such as workshops to bring people together and create a social atmosphere.
  6. Continuously assess and make changes to the menu and event schedule based on community feedback.
  7. Create a marketing strategy to raise awareness about the restaurant and its focus on locally-grown organic food and community-focused events.
  8. Utilize social media and community networks to promote the restaurant and its events.
  9. Establish partnerships with local businesses and organizations to promote cross-promotion and further engage the community.
  10. Continuously review and refine the business model to ensure that the restaurant remains profitable and sustainable, while continuing to meet the needs of the community.

Business model for a Community-led Care-Giving Operation

Please Design a Community-led Care-Giving Business Plan, which will provide a variety of non-medical, personalized services to anyone in need of a helping-hand, with a focus on Vulnerable, Aged, and Disability populations. Requests for help can be made via call, SMS, or app, and are matched with volunteers from the community who have the necessary skills. Services can include anything the person needs help with such as cleaning, shopping, meal preparation, companionship, organization, driving, moving, painting a room, gardening and more — whatever you need help with. Customers will pay $20/hr, and profits will be distributed among volunteer contributors, who provide 3 hours of their time each week. A “call-out for financial assistance” option allows members to donate to support those who cannot afford the service.

A comprehensive Business Plan for a Community-led Care-Giving Operation could include the following elements:

  1. Executive Summary: A brief overview of the business idea, the target audience, and the goals of the operation.
  2. Market Analysis: A deep dive into the market and competition, with a focus on the target audience, their needs, and how the operation will differentiate itself from other care-giving services.
  3. Services: A detailed description of the services offered, including cleaning, shopping, meal preparation, companionship, organization, driving, moving, and more.
  4. Revenue Model: An explanation of the pricing strategy, including a flat rate of $20/hr and a “call-out for financial assistance” option.
  5. Operations: An overview of the day-to-day operations, including how requests for help will be made and matched with volunteers, and how the profits will be distributed among the volunteers.
  6. Marketing and Advertising: A strategy for promoting the business and reaching the target audience, including online and offline marketing efforts, partnerships with local organizations, and community outreach.
  7. Management and Organizational Structure: A description of the management team, their roles and responsibilities, and the organizational structure of the operation.
  8. Financial Projections: Detailed financial projections for the first few years, including revenue, expenses, and profits.
  9. Conclusion: A final conclusion summarizing the business idea, the market, and the potential for success.

This Business Plan could be used as a roadmap for launching the Community-led Care-Giving Operation, and can be revised and updated as needed to ensure its success.

Business model for a Community-led Know Your Rights Legal Firm

Please Design a Community-Led Business Model for a “Know Your Rights Legal Firm” to increase accessibility to legal services by collaborating with human rights organizations, educating communities on their rights and available solutions, maintaining a database of common solutions, and advocating for bartering for legal advice. This business aims to restore integrity to the legal system and support those who prioritize human values over exploitation. The firm will serve as a legal resource for other community-led businesses, with all businesses using the firm for their legal needs. The firm will operate through volunteer contributions, where members of the community contribute 3 hours of their time per week, and profits will be shared among volunteers.

The Community-Led Business Model for the “Know Your Rights Legal Firm” includes the following steps:

  1. Collaboration with Human Rights Organizations: Partner with established human rights organizations to access resources, expertise, and support in legal advocacy.
  2. Education and Awareness: Educate communities on their rights and the solutions available to them through workshops, seminars, and community outreach programs.
  3. Database of Common Solutions: Build a database of common legal solutions to support clients and provide a reference for legal volunteers.
  4. Bartering System: Encourage bartering for legal services, allowing clients to exchange skills, knowledge, or resources for legal advice.
  5. Volunteer-Based Operations: Recruit volunteers from the community to provide legal services and support the firm’s operations.
  6. Community Contribution: Encourage community members to contribute 3 hours of their time per week to support the firm’s operations and growth.
  7. Sharing of Profits: Share the profits generated by the firm among the volunteers who have contributed their time and expertise.
  8. Legal Resource for Community-Led Businesses: Offer legal support and assistance to other community-led businesses, acting as a legal resource for these businesses.

The objective of this business model is to create an accessible, equitable, and sustainable legal service that prioritizes the needs of the community and the protection of human rights.

Business model for a Community-led internet company

Create a Business model for a Community-led internet company (ISP) where the community volunteers 3 hours of their time a week, gets free internet, and profits from the business.

  1. Community members volunteer 3 hours of their time each week to maintain and improve the network infrastructure.
  2. The community collectively owns the internet service provider (ISP) business, and profits are distributed equally among all members.
  3. The community offers free internet services to its members as a benefit for their participation.
  4. The business generates income from providing internet services to non-member customers in the surrounding area.
  5. The community invests in expanding and upgrading the network infrastructure to increase capacity and improve services.
  6. Community members receive training and education in networking, troubleshooting, and technical support.
  7. The business prioritizes providing affordable, fast, and reliable internet access, with a focus on serving under-connected communities.
  8. The business operates with transparency and accountability, with regular financial reports and decision-making processes open to all members.
  9. The business strives to maintain positive relationships with local government and telecommunications companies, while also advocating for policies that support community-led ISPs.
  10. The business seeks to empower the local community by providing access to information, education, and economic opportunities through the internet.

Business model for a Community-led Automotive-Repair business

Business model for a Community-led Automotive-Repair and Skills-Learning business where the community volunteers 3 hours of their time a week and profits from the business.

Here’s a sample community-led automotive-repair and skills-learning business model:

  1. The community members each volunteer 3 hours of their time per week.
  2. A central business location is established and equipped with the necessary tools and equipment for automotive repair.
  3. Members are trained in various areas of automotive repair such as engine repair, brake repair, transmission repair, etc.
  4. The business operates by offering its services to the community and charging a fair fee for repairs.
  5. The profits from the business are shared equally among all members who participated in the business that week.
  6. In addition to repairing cars, the business also offers workshops and training sessions for members to learn and hone their skills.
  7. The business also encourages members to bring in their own vehicles for repair, with the understanding that they will receive hands-on training from more experienced members.
  8. The business strives to use environmentally-friendly products and practices whenever possible.
  9. The business can also offer used car sales and car-part sales to the community.
  10. Regular meetings are held to discuss and make decisions on business operations and finances.

The model emphasizes community involvement, skills development, and mutual support, while also providing a valuable service to the community and generating profits for its members.

Business model for a Community-led EMF-Protection Enterprise

What do EMF Protection companies sell in their product lines?

EMF Protection companies typically sell a variety of products designed to shield people from the harmful effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs). These products include EMF blocking paint and fabrics, radiation protection devices, cell phone radiation protectors, anti-radiation bedding and clothing, EMF radiation shielding devices for laptops and other electronics, and EMF blockers for cars.

What are some examples of anti-radiation clothing?

  1. Tyvek Protective Suits: Tyvek protective suits are made from a flash-spun polyethylene material that offers protection from gamma, neutron and beta radiation. The suits are lightweight and breathable, making them comfortable to wear for long periods of time.
  2. Lead-Lined Aprons: Lead-lined aprons are commonly used in medical settings to protect against radiation exposure. The aprons feature a lead lining on the inside to block out harmful rays and protect the wearer from radiation exposure.
  3. Radiation Shields: Radiation shields provide another layer of protection by blocking out gamma rays and other forms of ionizing radiation. They can be made with various materials such as lead or boron nitride, depending on the type of radiation being shielded against.
  4. RF Shielding Clothing: RF shielding clothing is designed to block out radio frequencies that can cause damage to internal organs when exposed for too long a period of time Such clothing is especially useful when working with high powered electronics or near microwave towers without proper safety measures in place

20 EMF-Shielding Products that you could sell at a Weekend Market

  1. EMF-Blocking Cases for smartphones
  2. EMF-Protective Stickers for laptops
  3. EMF-Blocking Curtains
  4. EMF-Blocking Clothing
  5. EMF-Blocking Sleeping Bags
  6. EMF-Blocking Pillowcases
  7. EMF-Blocking Mattress Pads
  8. EMF-Blocking Backpacks
  9. EMF-Blocking Car Seat Covers
  10. EMF-Blocking Baby Swaddle Blankets
  11. EMF-Blocking Cell Phone Signaling Pouches
  12. EMF-Blocking Wireless Router Shields
  13. EMF-Blocking Headphone and Earbud Wraps
  14. EMF-Blocking Office Desk Pad
  15. EMF-Blocking Car Key Fob Protectors
  16. EMF-Blocking Pet Bed Covers
  17. EMF-Blocking Laptop Skins
  18. EMF-Blocking Car Charger Shields
  19. EMF-Blocking Faraday Bags for Devices
  20. EMF-Blocking Meters and Detectors

What EMF/ELF Blocking or Shielding options are there for cell towers?

There are several options for EMF/ELF blocking or shielding for cell towers, including:

  1. Building Faraday Cages
  2. Using EMF/ELF Shielding Paint
  3. Installing EMF/ELF Shielding Films
  4. Using Metamaterials
  5. Installing Electromagnetic Shielding Mesh
  6. Implementing Electromagnetic Shielding Boxes
  7. Installing Shielded Enclosures
  8. Implementing Shielded Rooms
  9. Using EMF/ELF Shielding Textiles
  10. Applying Grounding Techniques

It is important to note that while these options can reduce exposure to EMF/ELF, they may not completely eliminate it. Consultation with an expert in electromagnetic radiation and shielding is recommended to determine the best solution for your needs.

What are the top 10 most accurate ELF-measuring Devices?

Unfortunately, as a language model AI, I do not have the capability to rate products or devices based on their accuracy. However, some popular brands known for producing ELF-measuring devices include:

  1. TriField
  2. Cornet
  3. Acoustimeter
  4. Gigahertz Solutions
  5. AlphaLab
  6. Narda Safety Test Solutions
  7. EFplus
  8. Ludlum Measurements
  9. EMFields
  10. Holaday Industries

It is advisable to check product specifications, customer reviews and compare with other brands before purchasing.

How do they detect ELF?

ELF (extremely low frequency) fields are detected using electromagnetic field (EMF) meters. These devices use various technologies such as magnetic field sensors, electric field sensors, and radio frequency (RF) sensors to measure the strength and frequency of ELF signals. Some meters also have multiple sensors and the ability to display both electric and magnetic field readings. The accuracy of the measurement depends on the quality and sensitivity of the sensors used in the device.

What devices can be used to detect MAC addresses?

The following devices can be used to detect MAC addresses:

  1. Wireless network analyzers
  2. Smartphone apps
  3. Laptops with Wi-Fi capabilities
  4. Ethernet network adapters
  5. Wireless access points
  6. Bluetooth scanners
  7. Wi-Fi sniffers
  8. Wireless monitoring tools
  9. Handheld network analyzers
  10. Professional network analyzers

What devices can be used to detect dangerous EMF frequencies?

Devices used to detect dangerous EMF frequencies include:

  1. Gauss meters
  2. Tri-Field Meters
  3. AC Electric Field Meters
  4. RF Spectrum Analyzers
  5. EMF Dosimeters
  6. AC Magnetic Field Meters
  7. AC Electric & Magnetic Field Meters
  8. RF Detectors
  9. Low Frequency Analyzers
  10. Combined Electric & Magnetic Field Meters.

What type of paint or what is the ingredient used in paint, that blocks radiation from cell towers?

There is no specific type of paint that blocks radiation from cell towers. However, certain materials such as metal or conductive materials have been known to have a shielding effect on electromagnetic radiation. In order to effectively block radiation, these materials would have to be used in multiple layers and in a specific configuration. It’s important to note that the effectiveness of shielding varies depending on frequency, distance, and power levels of the radiation source, so proper professional analysis and testing is important before any shielding materials or methods are implemented.

Which metals block cell tower radiation?

Certain metals like aluminum, copper, and silver are known to have electromagnetic shielding properties and can block cell tower radiation to some extent. However, the effectiveness of a metal’s ability to block radiation depends on its thickness and the frequency of the radiation. It’s also important to note that complete blocking of cell tower radiation may not be possible as the radiofrequency (RF) signals from cell towers can penetrate through some materials.

List products that are used as Faraday cages for cars, laptops, phones, and home

Products used as Faraday cages for cars, laptops, phones, and home include:

  • Metal cases or sleeves made of aluminum or copper
  • Faraday bags made of metallic materials
  • Faraday boxes or pouches made of metal-lined fabric
  • Metal-lined curtains or blinds
  • Car window film with metal layers
  • Metalized window shades or curtains
  • Metal-lined phone cases
  • Metal-lined laptop cases or skins
  • Metal-lined laptop pads
  • Metalized wallpapers or adhesive films.

Design a community-led business model that creates Faraday curtains, Faraday bags for phones, EMF/ELF Shielding Textiles, grounding-devices, EMF-Blocking Blankets, EMF/ELF detectors and alarms, Bluetooth scanners, Network Analyzers, EMF-Blocking Hats, Shirts, Gloves, and Pants, where the community volunteers 3 hours of their time a week, manufacturing and selling the products, and the community profits from the business.

  1. Community Volunteer Model: The community-led business model is based on volunteerism, where members contribute 3 hours of their time each week to manufacture and sell the products.
  2. Product Range: The business will produce Faraday curtains, Faraday bags for phones, EMF/ELF Shielding Textiles, grounding devices, EMF-Blocking Blankets, EMF/ELF detectors and alarms, Bluetooth scanners, Network Analyzers, EMF-Blocking Hats, Shirts, Gloves, and Pants.
  3. Manufacturing Process: The volunteers will be trained to manufacture the products using appropriate materials and techniques. The business will invest in necessary equipment and tools to facilitate the manufacturing process.
  4. Sales and Distribution: The products will be sold online and at local markets, and the business will also reach out to relevant organizations and individuals to promote its products.
  5. Revenue Generation: The community will profit from the business by receiving cash dividends from the profits generated, which will be distributed equally among all participants.
  6. Quality Control: The business will establish a quality control process to ensure that all products meet the necessary standards and requirements.
  7. Sustainability: The business will aim to operate sustainably, using eco-friendly materials and reducing waste where possible.
  8. Community Involvement: The business will involve the community in decision-making processes and seek feedback on its products and services.
  9. Marketing and Promotion: The business will invest in marketing and promotion activities to increase awareness of its products and services.
  10. Continuous Improvement: The business will continuously review and improve its operations, processes, and products to remain competitive and relevant in the market.

Business Model for Greenhouse Business

Create a community-led Business Model for a Greenhouse Business, that includes growing and selling the top 40 nutrient-rich foods as seedlings and trees, where the community volunteers 3 hours of their time a week and profits from the business.

Here’s one possible business model for a community-led greenhouse business:

  1. Purpose: To create a sustainable and profitable greenhouse business that provides high-quality, nutrient-rich food to the community while also educating and empowering members with gardening skills.
  2. Structure: The business is owned and operated by the community, with each member contributing 3 hours of volunteer time per week. Members can also participate in decision-making through regular meetings and voting on important business matters.
  3. Products: The greenhouse grows and sells seedlings and trees of the top 40 nutrient-rich foods, such as leafy greens, herbs, fruits, and vegetables. The products are grown using organic and sustainable methods, ensuring maximum nutrition and health benefits for consumers.
  4. Sales: The seedlings and trees can be sold directly to the community at local farmers markets and through online sales platforms. The business can also partner with local grocery stores and restaurants to sell the products wholesale.
  5. Skills Development: The greenhouse also provides educational opportunities for members to learn about gardening and agriculture, including hands-on experience in the greenhouse. Workshops and classes can also be offered to the wider community, further promoting the business and empowering individuals with new skills.
  6. Profit Distribution: All profits from the business are divided equally among members, providing a source of income for the community and encouraging involvement and investment in the business.
  7. Future Growth: As the business grows, it can expand its product line to include other crops and products, such as canned goods and dried herbs, and potentially branch out into other areas of sustainable agriculture, such as permaculture and aquaponics. The business can also explore the possibility of community-owned farm land to further support the growth and success of the enterprise.

Business Model for Ready-to-Go Balcony Gardens and Food Boxes

Develop a Community-Driven Business Model for Instant Balcony Gardens and Food Boxes where we grow seedlings and offer ready-to-use herb gardens and balcony gardens for sale, as well as food boxes for items that cannot be grown in limited spaces to which we grow and source from local farmers. The community contributes 3 hours of their time each week and shares in the business’s profits.

Here’s a possible business model for a community-driven instant balcony garden and food box business:

  1. Business name and structure: The business could be called “Green Thumbs Balcony Gardens & Food Boxes” and it could be structured as a cooperative or a social enterprise, where all members of the community have equal ownership and decision-making power.
  2. Mission: The mission of the business is to provide healthy, locally-grown food options and create community-driven, sustainable agriculture initiatives.
  3. Products: The business will offer ready-to-use balcony gardens, herb gardens, and food boxes, all grown and sourced from local farmers. The balcony gardens will include a variety of herbs, vegetables, and fruits that can be grown in small spaces, and the food boxes will include items such as grains, dairy, and meats.
  4. Operations: The community members will contribute 3 hours of their time each week to the business, which could be divided into tasks such as growing the seedlings, sourcing food from local farmers, packaging and delivering the food boxes, and selling the products.
  5. Sales and marketing: The business could sell its products through local farmers markets, community events, and online platforms. A marketing plan could include social media advertising, collaborations with local businesses, and word of mouth marketing.
  6. Profits: The profits of the business will be shared among the community members in an equitable manner, as determined by the community. The profits could be used to reinvest in the business, to provide benefits to the community members, or to support other community initiatives.
  7. Challenges and solutions: Some challenges the business could face include securing local food sources, managing volunteer hours, and dealing with seasonality. To address these challenges, the business could work closely with local farmers, have a clear and flexible volunteer structure, and have a plan for seasonality.

Business model for a community-led grocery store

Create a business model for a community-led grocery store, where the focus is on locally-sourced ingredients, and where the community volunteers 3 hours of their time a week and profits from the business.

Here’s a possible business model for a community-led grocery store:

  1. Start by conducting market research and identifying a need for a community-led grocery store in the area.
  2. Assemble a team of volunteers who are passionate about local food, sustainability, and community-building.
  3. Secure funding for start-up costs such as leasing a storefront, purchasing equipment and supplies, and advertising.
  4. Partner with local farmers, ranchers, and producers to offer a wide range of locally-sourced food items.
  5. Organize a volunteer program where members of the community contribute 3 hours of their time each week to work in the store.
  6. Offer training and development opportunities for volunteers to build their skills and knowledge in areas such as customer service, merchandising, and food preparation.
  7. Create a unique shopping experience by offering special events and workshops, such as cooking demonstrations, gardening classes, and food-based discussions.
  8. Implement sustainable business practices, such as reducing waste and energy consumption, and promoting environmentally-friendly products.
  9. Offer a loyalty program to reward customers who regularly shop at the store and contribute to the community.
  10. Regularly assess the business’s performance and make changes to improve profitability and customer satisfaction.
  11. Share the profits with the community, either by distributing dividends or investing in community initiatives.

By offering locally-sourced food, fostering a strong community spirit, and promoting sustainable business practices, this community-led grocery store can offer a unique and valuable shopping experience while generating profits for the community.

Business model for a community-led drive-thru lunch bar

Create a business model for a community-led drive-thru lunch-bar containing fresh, organic locally-sourced foods, ready-to-go healthy-lunch options, smoothies, salads, stews, soups, frozen fruit, fruit salad, dahl, fruit platters, casseroles and wraps, where the community volunteers 3 hours of their time a week and profits from the business.

A community-led drive-thru lunch bar business model could be created as follows:

  1. The community comes together and volunteers 3 hours of their time per week to run the lunch bar.
  2. The menu focuses on fresh, organic, and locally-sourced foods that are both healthy and delicious. This includes options such as smoothies, salads, stews, soups, frozen fruit, fruit salad, dahl, fruit platters, casseroles, and wraps.
  3. The community purchases the necessary ingredients and equipment to run the lunch bar.
  4. The lunch bar operates from a centralized location that is easily accessible to the community.
  5. The profits from the business are shared among the members of the community who volunteer their time.
  6. The lunch bar could also host community events and evening seminars, movie nights, fun activities and workshops, in order to foster a sense of community and support local farmers.
  7. Marketing strategies could include word-of-mouth, social media, flyers, and advertisements in local newspapers.
  8. The business could also consider partnering with local farmers to source the ingredients for their menu items and support the local economy.
  9. The community could also establish a system for feedback and suggestions from customers to continually improve the business and its offerings.

Business model for edible tableware

Those who are aware of the climate-hysteria-agenda taken over by greedy corporations, please don’t throw up at this business idea, it’s still a good thing to not be humans contributing to endless garbage :)

Create a franchise idea based on the following: Design a Community-Led Franchise Business Model for an “Edible Tableware” production company, offering healthy and eco-friendly options such as bowls, cups, plates, forks, spoons, and cones made from edible ingredients targeting food trucks, street food vendors, event, party, and catering venues focused on sustainability and waste reduction. The franchise operates through volunteer contributions, where community members donate 3 hours of their time per week and share in the profits. All ingredients will be sourced locally, organic, and free from common allergens.

The “Edible Tableware” franchise will offer a unique solution to the food industry’s waste problem by providing an alternative to traditional, non-degradable tableware. The franchise’s products will be made from edible ingredients, ensuring they are both healthy and environmentally friendly. By sourcing ingredients locally and using only organic and allergen-free ingredients, the franchise will appeal to conscious consumers who prioritize sustainability and health.

The franchise will be community-led, with members donating 3 hours of their time per week to help run the business and sharing in the profits. This model will provide an opportunity for individuals to get involved in creating a more sustainable future while also generating income.

The franchise will target food trucks, street food vendors, event and party planners, and catering venues who prioritize waste reduction. With a growing demand for environmentally responsible products and services, the “Edible Tableware” franchise is well positioned to succeed in the market and make a positive impact on the environment.

Create a manufacturing production business model for a Community-Led “Edible Tableware” company, offering healthy and eco-friendly options such as bowls, cups, plates, forks, spoons, and cones made from edible ingredients targeting food trucks, street food vendors, event, party, and catering venues focused on sustainability and waste reduction, where community members donate 3 hours of their time per week and share in the profits. All ingredients will be sourced locally, organic, and free from common allergens.

The business model for the Community-Led “Edible Tableware” company would involve the following steps:

  1. Sourcing of locally sourced, organic, and allergen-free ingredients to manufacture the edible tableware.
  2. Develop a manufacturing process that is sustainable and eco-friendly, with a focus on reducing waste.
  3. Partner with food trucks, street food vendors, event, party, and catering venues that prioritize sustainability and waste reduction to sell the edible tableware.
  4. Encourage community members to volunteer 3 hours of their time per week to help with the manufacturing process, distribution, and sales.
  5. Implement a profit-sharing program for community members who volunteer their time and effort to the business.
  6. Regularly educate the community about the importance of sustainability and reducing waste through events, workshops, and community outreach programs.
  7. Continuously innovate and improve the edible tableware products to meet the changing needs and preferences of customers.
  8. Collaborate with other businesses and organizations that share the same values and goals to increase the reach and impact of the business.

Essential Businesses

What is a list of 20 essential products and services that every town and city needs in the world

  1. Food and grocery stores
  2. Medical facilities and hospitals
  3. Emergency services (fire, police, ambulance)
  4. Education (primary, secondary, higher education)
  5. Transportation (public transportation, taxi services)
  6. Banking and financial services
  7. Utilities (electricity, water, gas)
  8. Housing and real estate
  9. Retail shops and malls
  10. Communication services (telephone, internet, postal)
  11. Religious and community spaces
  12. Parks and recreational areas
  13. Waste management and recycling services
  14. Automotive services (gas stations, repair shops)
  15. Legal services
  16. Employment and job services
  17. Art and cultural spaces
  18. Sports and fitness facilities
  19. Tourism and hospitality industry
  20. Environmental protection and sustainability initiatives.

20 Essential Products in 1500s

Here is a list of 20 essential products in the 1500s:

  1. Food staples (grains, fruits, vegetables)
  2. Clothing and textiles (wool, linen, silk)
  3. Metal tools (iron, steel)
  4. Horse-drawn vehicles (carriages, carts)
  5. Building materials (timber, stone, brick)
  6. Livestock (horses, cattle, sheep)
  7. Agriculture equipment (plows, sickles, hoes)
  8. Weapons (swords, arrows, firearms)
  9. Medical supplies (herbs, remedies, instruments)
  10. Candles and lighting (beeswax, tallow)
  11. Navigation equipment (compasses, maps)
  12. Household goods (pottery, glassware, cutlery)
  13. Spices and seasonings (pepper, ginger, cinnamon)
  14. Soap and hygiene products (lye soap, towels)
  15. Writing materials (quills, ink, parchment)
  16. Musical instruments (lutes, harps, flutes)
  17. Religious artifacts (books, icons, vestments)
  18. Dyes and pigments (indigo, madder, cochineal)
  19. Jewelry and precious metals (gold, silver, pearls)
  20. Luxury goods (velvet, silk, furs).

Helping Hands Community Database Model

Design a community-led business model based on a “Helping Hands” central database that provides any kind of assistance for the price of $20 per hour for a maximum of 3 hours. The request will be sent to a central newsfeed where all community members can search for tasks, and it will automatically match and notify individuals in the community with closely matching skillsets. If no one “accepts” the task within 24 hours, the request is sent to the next-best match. If there is no response, the request is sent to a team that will follow-up with the customer and try to locate the right person to help with the task.

The “Helping Hands” community-led business model is designed to provide assistance to anyone in need, for a nominal fee of $20 per hour, with a maximum of 3 hours of service. The request for help is sent to a central newsfeed, where all community members can search for tasks. The newsfeed automatically matches the request with individuals in the community who have the necessary skillset and notifies them. If there is no response within 24 hours, the request is forwarded to the next best match. If there is still no response, a team will follow up with the customer and try to locate the right person to help with the task.

The “Helping Hands” database is a central hub for community members to search for tasks, post their skills and offer their services to others. This business model allows community members to use their skills to help others, while also providing a source of income.

This business model encourages a sense of community, where individuals with various skillsets come together to help each other. It creates a network of people who can offer their services, connect with others and get paid for their time and skills. This creates a win-win situation for both the service provider and the person in need, as both benefit from the exchange of services.

Each time a community member provides assistance, they receive a token for each $20 paid by the customer. The $20 per hour fee goes into a central fund managed by the database. At the end of the month, all members who offered their skills to help others will be rewarded equally with the profits of the business based on the number of tokens they have earned. For example, if Jim helps Sarah for 2 hours, he will receive 2 tokens and Sarah pays $40. At the end of the month, the overhead costs of the business are deducted and the remaining profits (i.e. $10,000 minus $100 = $9,900) are distributed among all members with tokens. If there are 500 tokens, each token will receive $19.80. As Jim has 2 tokens, he will receive $39.60.

What are extra ways this business can earn an income?

There are several ways the “Helping Hands” community-led business can earn additional income, such as:

  1. Advertising – partner with local businesses to display their ads in exchange for a fee.
  2. Premium Features – Offer premium services for a fee such as background checks, higher priority task matching, etc.
  3. Subscription Model – Implement a monthly or yearly subscription model for members who want to use the services frequently.
  4. Commission on task completion – charge a small fee for every task successfully completed through the platform.
  5. Upselling related products/services – Offer related products and services at a markup, such as insurance, supplies, etc.
  6. Corporate partnerships – Partner with corporations to offer services to their employees.
  7. Expansion to new communities – Expand the business to new communities and offer franchise opportunities.

These are some of the ways the “Helping Hands” business can generate additional income while continuing to fulfill its mission of providing assistance to the community.

Hmm.. no.

What are extra ways the business can make an income if they are offering the following services:

Home Repair and Maintenance Services, Personal Chef and Meal Delivery Services, Grocery Delivery and Shopping Services, Home Cleaning Services, Laundry and Ironing Services, Personal Care Services (e.g. grooming), Child Care and Tutoring Services, Transportation Services (e.g. rides, errands), Pet Care Services (e.g. walking, feeding), Handyman Services (e.g. odd jobs, repairs), Yard Maintenance and Gardening Services, Shopping and Errand Services, Technology Support Services, Financial Management and Bookkeeping Services, Personal Organizing Services, Home Organization and Decluttering Services, Senior Care Services (e.g. companionship, support), Event Planning and Coordination Services, Community Volunteer Services (e.g. mentorship, support groups).

  1. Selling products related to the services offered (e.g. home repair tools, pet food and supplies, cleaning supplies, etc.)
  2. Providing extended warranties on services or products sold
  3. Offering subscription packages for long-term clients at reduced rates
  4. Running promotional campaigns with discounted rates for new customers
  5. Offering package deals or bundle discounts on services purchased together
  6. Upselling additional services to existing customers
  7. Training other professionals in the service offering the business provides
  8. Selling gift certificates to prospective customers as a way of pre-payment
  9. Renting out equipment and tools used in offering the service
  10. Leveraging advertising platforms such as Google Ads and social media channels

How can a business structure their pricing plan to charge $20 per hour for services to those in the most vulnerable situations, but charge more for the same service to those with greater financial resources?

One option would be to offer a sliding scale pricing plan based on each customer’s financial resources. Customers with more financial resources could pay more than the base $20 per hour rate, while those in the most vulnerable situations would be able to receive services at the lower rate. The business could also offer discounts or loyalty programs for repeat customers that have fewer financial resources, allowing them to access services more affordably.

Maybe this is when the tool library and similar initiatives could be beneficial. It is clear that everyone is currently facing financial hardship (or will be when the CBDCs come in), so it may be difficult to create a situation where a strong sense of community can be established where people are able to help each other without a financial incentive. We must find a balanced solution that is mutually beneficial in order to create a strong community spirit. It would be ideal if we could establish a community-led business to form the bond within the community, but the business also needs to provide enough profit for those who partake in it to get back on their feet.

Is it fair to also offer a “donate to member” option for those who received the service, who feel like the person helping them deserves a lot more than $20, can donate directly to that person? Probably, but maybe they can do that directly with the person.

What ways can an online portal matching skills with service providers earn an income?

  1. Advertising: Online portals can generate income through displaying ads on their platform.
  2. Subscription/Membership Fees: An online portal can charge users a subscription fee to access certain features or content on the platform.
  3. Pay-per-use Model: Providing services which users pay for each time they use them, such as consultations with experts or skill assessment tests etc., is another way for the online portal to earn income from its users.
  4. Commission on Transactions: The platform can also charge commission from service providers whenever a transaction between them and a user takes place, either directly or through affiliated partners’ programs such as product sales and other forms of monetization through affiliate links etc..

hmm… no.

What are some open source software (similar to Dolphin or Joomla or Drupal) that one could use to be able to handle an online community database that matches skills and other keywords (such as appliances, vehicles, or tools needed), handles online payments, provides service providers with “coupons” and automatically provides profits minus business expenses to all members who received coupons.

One could use open source software such as WordPress, Magento, or PrestaShop to handle an online community database that matches skills and other keywords (such as appliances, vehicles, or tools needed), handles online payments, provides service providers with “coupons” and automatically provides profits minus business expenses to all members who received coupons.

Mock Letters to Someone Selling an Ideal Local Business

Please write a letter offering a community-led solution to someone selling their local business. The solution will entail the “Ubuntu” philosophy, where the business owner will become an investor, not working on the business, but still earning 1/3 of the profits, and the community would become the employees who work 3 hours per week each, and 2/3 of any profits (minus overheads) will be distributed amongst all the community volunteers at the end of each month. This allows the business owner to pursue new interests while continuing to profit from the business, and all members of the community can work together towards a collective goal which benefits everyone involved. The business owner (now investor) can still choose to be involved if they wish, by offering mentorship and advice, and may even choose to work in the business for up to 6 hours per week (and receive the extra distribution income from the 2/3 profit income stream.

Dear [Business Owner],

We hope this letter finds you well. We understand that you may be considering selling your local business and moving on to new opportunities. We would like to offer you a different solution, one that is community-led and aligns with the “Ubuntu” philosophy (an idea that roughly translates to “human kindness”).

Under this model, you will become an investor in the business, earning 1/3 of the profits while not having to work on the business itself. The community will become the employees, working 3 hours per week each and earning 2/3 of any profits (minus overheads) that will be distributed amongst all the community volunteers at the end of each month.

This arrangement allows you to pursue new interests while still profiting from the business you have built and nurtured. The business will become a hub that strengthens the community bond, creates jobs and opportunities for the community, and allows the town and its people to become stronger, not relying on outside corporations and investors for essential services.

If you choose to, you can still be involved in the business by offering mentorship and advice, or by working in the business for up to 6 hours per week. By doing so, you would receive an extra distribution from the 2/3 profit income stream.

We believe this community-led solution would be a win-win for both you and the community. If you are interested in discussing this further, please do not hesitate to reach out to us.

Thank you for your time and consideration.
Sincerely, [Your Name/Community Group]

Dear [Business Owner],

I hope this letter finds you well. I understand that you are currently in the process of selling your local business and I would like to offer you a unique solution that can benefit both you and the community.

The solution is based on the “Ubuntu” philosophy, where individuals come together to form a collective entity, working towards a common goal while supporting each other in the process. In this case, your business can become a community-led initiative, where the community takes on the responsibility of running the business, while you remain as an investor, earning a portion of the profits.

Here’s how it would work: you would become an investor, retaining a third of the profits generated by the business, while the community members become the employees, who volunteer three-six hours per week each. The remaining two thirds of the profits will be distributed amongst all community volunteers at the end of each month.

You can still choose to remain involved in any capacity that you wish; offering mentorship and advice to community members, or even continue to work in the business for up to six hours per week should you choose (thereby earning extra distribution income from the 2/3 profit stream).

This arrangement enables you to pursue new interests while continuing to profit and staying part of something that you have built and nurtured, The business will serve as a unifying local-hub that strengthens the town and provides jobs and opportunities for local residents. This will foster a stronger community, reducing the dependence on outside corporations.

With the traditional business model, the owner takes all the profits and pays employees for their hours worked. However, with our community-led solution, both the investor and the individuals in the community can follow their passions and interests while still earning a livelihood.

I believe this solution is a win-win for everyone involved, and I would be happy to discuss it further with you if you are interested. Please let me know if you would like to schedule a meeting to discuss this proposal.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Best regards,

[Your Name]

Dear [Name],

Congratulations on your decision to sell your business. It’s an exciting time, and I’m sure you’re looking forward to new opportunities in the future.

I wanted to extend to you an alternative solution which could be beneficial for all involved. The concept is based on Ubuntu philosophy – a collective collaboration between the community and yourself, where people come together for mutual benefit.

Rather than selling your business outright, you can become an investor in it, still earning 1/3 of the profits each month. The remaining 2/3 of any profits (minus overheads) can be distributed amongst all community volunteers who work 3 hours per week each – allowing everyone to contribute towards a shared goal and benefit from it financially as well as emotionally through being part of something bigger than themselves. You can still choose to remain involved in any capacity that you wish; offering mentorship or working up to 6 hours a week should you choose so and receive extra income through the 2/3 profit income stream.

This form of collective enterprise has proven successful in other parts of the world by creating a sense of community ownership while giving everyone involved financial security while they pursue their individual goals or dreams. It’s also beneficial for those who may not have access to reliable employment opportunities due to their location or circumstances but would like some form of financial stability – this solution provides them with that opportunity while benefiting from supportive environment built around them by their peers doing similar work tasks and striving towards the same collective goals as them.

I hope this proposal resonates with you and that we may explore it further if desired so we can create a sustainable future together! Should there be any questions please do not hesitate contact me at [Your Contact Info]. Best wishes!

Dear [Business Owner],

I hope this letter finds you well. I am writing to introduce you to a new business model that is based on the “Ubuntu” philosophy, where community members work together to support and grow a local business.

We understand that running a business can be a challenging and demanding task, and you may be considering selling your local business. Our solution offers a unique opportunity for you to become an investor in the business while still receiving a portion of the profits. Under this model, you would earn 1/3 of the profits while the community becomes the employees who work 3 hours per week each. The remaining 2/3 of the profits, minus overheads, would be distributed amongst all the community volunteers at the end of each month.

This arrangement allows you to pursue new interests while continuing to profit from the business you have built and nurtured. You can still choose to be involved in the business if you wish, by offering mentorship and advice, and you may even choose to work in the business for up to 6 hours per week, which would earn you an extra distribution income from the 2/3 profit stream.

We believe this model offers a unique opportunity for you to take advantage of a community-led solution while also helping to strengthen the bonds

We believe this model offers a unique opportunity for you to take advantage of a community-led solution while also helping to strengthen the bonds within the community. It creates jobs and opportunities for community members, and helps keep corporations out of local businesses.

If you are interested in learning more about this community-led business model, we would be happy to arrange a meeting to discuss the details further.

Thank you for considering this opportunity, and we look forward to hearing back from you soon.

Best regards, [Your Name]

Mock Food-Truck schedule to help understand the model

I’m still without internet, so can’t watch the videos and other things on their site, and that’s also why all the posts are different lately – imagine someone trying to use one of the old 56k dial-up modems trying to do research in today’s times, and you’ll get close to the frustration someone like me feels at the moment lol. Normally having close to 1000 tabs open, at least 6 pdfs and 40 tabs of wordpad notes. But anyway, I digress.

Food Truck Idea

Every time I look at the empty former restaurant and the abandoned former pub on the highway near where I live, I think what a shame. All the trucks that drive past these buildings daily; the truckers used to be able to stop and grab a home-cooked healthy bistro-like meal, a shower, and a comfy place to rest for an hour or so on their way to the next city.

But over the past decade, everything has changed. You can’t buy any healthy food on the highway. Corporations offer Coke, Monster, Packets of Pretty-Wrappers of Chips and Chocolate, and Pie-warmer food and what they call “healthy” is a $8 sandwich with a piece of lettuce and cheese between two pieces of processed bread.

So when I look at the abandoned buildings, I think it’s such a shame that all these highway drivers; particularly the truck drivers but it applies to everyone, never get anything resembling “healthy” anymore. Without nutrition, they are probably reliant on pills to keep them awake and pills to help them sleep and pills for their declining health. Driving around almost ‘lobotomized’.

“Food that Heals”

I imagine having a Food Truck just past these abandoned businesses with real “food is thy medicine” kind of concept. Healthy “Soul Food” meals, drinks that nourish the body, cold meals that aren’t full of sugar and other processed crap with names no one can pronounce. “Real Food”. Something that can give them energy naturally, to throw those pills in the bin, and repair their declining health.

Toxin-free, Chemical-free, Pesticide & Insecticide-free, Hormone-free, mRNA-free, GMO-free. Just home grown foods, locally sourced, organic, nourishing food that the whole community can benefit from.

I jotted down the kinds of food that would be ideal:

Drinks:
Smoothie Cup: Greens, Berries, Grapes, Fruit, Citrus, Mango, Banana, MACA

Soups:
Fresh Cup of Hot Healthy In-Season Vegetable Soup
(Lentils, Celery, In-season Fresh Vegetables & Herbs)

Cold Meals:
Cup of Fresh Frozen In-Season Organic Fruit Sundae (Real Bananas & Berries, not fake flavoured ice-cream, real fruit “real food”)
Cup of Berries, Grapes, Fruit Salad
Cup of Yogurt, Seeds, Nuts, and Berries
Cup of Chickpea Salad
Avocado Sushi
Platter of Raw Food (Carrots, Celery, Grapes, Cherry Tomatoes, Olives, Cherries, Watermelon, Cucumber, Dates)

Hot Meals:
Hearty, Truckies, Home-Cooked Soul-Food, Just like Mama used to make, mRNA-free
1.) Rissoles & Gravy, Mash, Peas, Broccoli & Carrots
2.) Casserole/Stew, with Mash or Rice
Light or Vegetarian
3.) Chow Mein
4. ) Dahl with Rice

Truck
Food Truck or MiniVan or Bus or Trailer

Equipment
I then wrote down all possible equipment and appliances the truck would need to have to be able to serve the above foods. I imagine, that the food prep doesn’t need to actually be done “in the truck” itself, but a kitchen elsewhere could bulk slow-cook the casseroles, stews, chow mein, dahl, and soups. The setup of the Truck would be the largest expense, and after the truck is setup, then things start paying for itself. We might use “rent to buy” or “hire” appliances to lower the start-up costs. Appliances needed would be back-of-house blenders, freezer, fridge, crockpots x 4, hot plate, sink, power, front-of-house Cooler for “ready-2-go” cups and platters (Fruit salad cups, Yogurt, Avocado sushi, etc)

Location
To get the business started, I imagine we’d have to start in Weekend Markets, and this is how I calculated the approximate amount of staff-hours needed to run a “Weekend” Food Truck that just operated on Saturdays and Sundays at first (to get things rolling) and that as we learn and adjust to the market needs, we could re-locate on different days/evenings to highway truck-stops, swimming pools, universities, and elsewhere in the community.

Staff/Co-Owners (26)
26 x 3 = 78 hrs / week Labour (SLOTS)
Sunday = 27 Slots (9 staff)
Saturday = 24+12 = 36 slots (12 staff)
Friday = 15 Slots (5 staff)

Does the above make sense? If we had 26 people invested in working “3 hours” a week, then that accounts to 26 x 3 = 78 hrs a week in labour slots. I’m sure some staff will choose the “6 hour” option but I’m calculating for the 3 hour option to try and understand how this business model would work.

Friday would be buying and prepping food for Saturday. Saturday would be running the truck at a Saturday market (7am-3pm), and staff prepping food for Sunday. Sunday would be 7am-5pm. In addition to food buyers, food preparation and cooking, and serving, we need artwork for the truck, marketing person to promote the truck, and admin-management to manage the budgets, schedules, and legal aspects.

Mock Schedule


FRIDAY – Food Purchasing for Weekend, Food Prep for Weekend, Fresh Meals for Saturday
* Prep for Saturday & Sunday Staff *
1 Food Purchase (any 3hr slot in morning) (1 x 3 = 3) — Drop Food off to Depot by Midday and Place in Cooler & Freezer in the Truck or Depot Fridge
2 Food Prep (any 3 hr slot after midday) (1 x 3 = 6) — Pickup Food from Depot and Prepare Food either in Truck or Separate Kitchen
2 Chefs (any 3 hr slot after 3pm) (2 x 3 = 6) — Pickup Food from Depot, 1 chef prepare casserole/stew, and season & prepare rissoles, another chef prepare dahl *& Veg Soup
alternatives could be :

  • 2 people who are together responsible for food purchase & prep
  • 2 people who are together responsible for food prep and cooking the casserole/soup
  • 2 people who are together responsible for cooking the casserole/stew/soup/chow mein

SATURDAY – 7am-3pm (8am-2pm service)
* Food Truck Staff *
2 slots (7am-10am, 7:30am-10:30am) (2 x 3 = 6)
4 Slots (9:00am-12:pm, 9:30am-12:30pm, 10:30am-1:30pm, 11am-2pm), (4 x 3 = 12)
2 Slots (11:30am-2:30pm, 12pm-3pm) (2 x 3 = 6)
Saturday Truck = 24 slots
* Prep for Sunday Staff *
2 Food Prep (any 3 hr slot) (2 x 3 = 6)
2 Chefs (any 3 hr slot) (2 x 3 = 6)
Saturday Prep = 12 slots
(This may be way too many people for the Sunday prep)


SUNDAY – 7am-5pm (8am-3:30pm service)
* Cross-over with Morning Staff and Return-to-Base Staff *
2 slots (7am-10am 7:30am-10:30am) (2 x 3 = 6)
4 Slots (9:30am-12:30pm, 10am-1pm, 10:30am-1:30pm, 11am-2pm), (4 x 3 = 12)
3 Slots (12pm-3pm, 1:30pm-4:30pm, 2pm-5pm) (3 x 3 = 9)
Sunday Truck = 27 slots

  • — First 2 drives and sets up truck at market, turns on all appliances, starts heating food & prepping raw “Ready2Go” foods
  • — 9:30am Staff Member takes photo of setup upon arrival and sends to private telegram group for marketing staff
  • — 9:30am Staff Member Continues helping to prep food and serve customers
  • — 10am Staff Member takes photo of “Ready-to-Go” Food and “Price Board” Upon Arrival and sends to private telegram group for marketing staff
  • — 10:30am Staff Member takes photo of Market, Landscape (include signage/photo of Outside of Truck), or Team Photo, and sends to marketing staff
  • — 11am Staff Member, service & prep
  • — 12pm Staff Member service & prep, and at 2:30pm stops prepping new packs, and starts marking down any “Ready-to-Go” items that haven’t sold
  • *— As each staff member arrives, upon arrival take photo of whatever your intuition tells you to take, and send to private telegram group for marketing staff
  • — Don’t do Marketing Promo after 1:30pm, (so 1:30pm+ staff don’t take photos when they arrive)
  • — 1:30pm Staff Member service & at 2:30pm, Make up “Take-away” packs from Crockpot meals and selling at discount.
  • — 2pm Staff Member service & start cleanup at 2:30pm
  • 3pm Staff Member can take a “Ready-2-Go” that hasn’t sold with them.
  • 4:30pm and 5pm Staff Members can distribute “Ready-2-go” that hasn’t sold with them or drop to Food-Bus or Homeless Shelter or Other Charity or Family Members/ Community on way home.
  • Community Members can show up at Truck between 3:30pm-4:30pm to see if there are any “Ready-To-Go” meals that haven’t sold to purchase at half-price.

I expanded and changed all this but just wanted to show a friend how I understood this model to work. This might change as I get more information, but I think this is how each person can work just “3 hours per week” in this business model.

Profit Potential for 3-6 hours a week

Important key points as I understand the model on “why” it would work. Normally you have a business owner that takes all the profits and pays wages to the staff. The staff can only earn for the hours they work and the “owner” takes all the profits. With this model. Some businesses will require an initial investor, and the investor gets 1/3 of the profits and the rest of the 2/3 profits gets distributed evenly among the workers. Allowing people to pursue their real passions, dreams and calling and still earning a living. They could also join many other community businesses doing the same thing, or you could have businesses that “fund” other business models for the community.

For example, as I understand it:

If there were 3 community-led businesses like this in the community. I could offer 3 hours of my time to each of those businesses (9 hours) and up to 6 hours of my time to each of those businesses (18 hours). Each 3 hours I work, I get a dividend “share” of the remaining profits. With a maximum 2 “shares” per business.

i.e. If the profit above overheads of one the business is $20,000/month.
And that business had 26 Community Co-Owners
(78 slots/wk, which is 26 x 3hrs week) or (312 slots/mo, which is 78 slots x 4 weeks)
(Which is 12 slots each per month, 3hrs x 4wks)
The initial investor would get $6,666/mo without having to work any hours.
The remaining two-thirds that gets divided among the community volunteers is $13,332/mo
$13,332 divided by 26 = $512/mo each for doing just 3 hrs a week.
If you did 6 hours, you would get $1025/mo.

You could potentially be paid more or less than an average wage, it depends on the profits of the business. In the above example of 20k/mo business profits, it works out at around $42/hr ($512/12hrs). Obviously each business would have different profit-potential and different amounts of staff, so each business could be quite lucrative or quite small, but it’s not just about profit either – imagine if you applied this principle to services that really help the community – that removed suffering from the community, that truly helped people! (Housing, Care, Education, Community, Health, Self-Sustainable Food, etc.). But for someone wanting to get an extra $1k a month and stay in an existing job, they could do so, or even getting an extra $1k a month in the times we live in could be life-changing.

Now if you have 3 businesses with the same concept, and the same amount of staff, and the same amount of profit, and you did 6 hours per business per week. You would get $1025/mo from each business.

If we have a community business model that profits $80K/mo, then you would get $4,100/mo from 6 hours a week.

So the idea is to come up with community-led businesses that can really serve the community, that has a high profit potential, which gives the profits back to the community instead of to the “corporations” sucking the profits out of a community.

Is it fair to the investor? Yes – the investor gets 1/3 of the profits without having to lift a finger.

Is it fair to the community? Yes – the community gets a dividend share of 2/3 of the profits, for just 3 hrs a week.

Can we create businesses that invest the profits “as an investor” so that the community makes 100% of the profits? That’s an idea to contemplate. It would give community members a chance to have more of the profits, but it also gives community members that “cannot work” due to their age, disability, or illness, a chance to make an income to survive as well.

That would mean if a business with 26 co-owners (via an investment fund), had $20k profit a month.
$6,666/mo = $256/mo each who invest, without working.

Bare in mind, all of this is the way my brain is trying to understand it, and everything is “mock” until I learn more, but I believe this is just one blueprint that may give us a chance to take back our communities away from the corporations, and work together with others, as well as form a “community” again so that things like the past 3 years can never happen again. We are stronger together.

onesmalltown

Maybe we need to let them do their thing, learn from their mistakes, and continue to think outside of the box in similar ways in our local communities. That’s my headspace at the moment. 5th Feb 2023.

I did reach out to the Australian Ambassador last week and left a voice message, but haven’t had a return call yet so maybe I’ll have more clarity on how it can work in Australia after that conversation happens.

Penny (PennyButler.com)
Penny (PennyButler.com)

Truth-seeker, ever-questioning, ever-learning, ever-researching, ever delving further and deeper, ever trying to 'figure it out'. This site is a legacy of sorts, a place to collect thoughts, notes, book summaries, & random points of interests.